Success stories

If you have a success story for gevent, contact post to the google group.

Omegle

I’ve been using gevent to power Omegle, my high-volume chat site, since 2010. Omegle is used by nearly half a million people every day, and it has as many as 20,000 users chatting at any given time. It needs to needs to perform well and be extremely reliable, and gevent makes that easy to do: gevent gives you power to do more creative things, and it’s fast enough that you can more easily write apps that stand up to a lot of load.

gevent is well-engineered, and its development has been maintaining an active, dedicated pace for as long as I’ve been following it. Any time I’ve had an issue with gevent that I couldn’t solve on my own, the friendly community has been extremely helpful and knowledgeable. I really think gevent is the best library of its type for Python right now, and I would recommend it to anyone who needs a good networking library.

– Leif K-Brooks, Founder, Omegle.com

Pediapress

Pediapress powers Wikipedia’s PDF rendering cluster. I’ve started using gevent in 2009 after our NFS based job queue showed serious performance problems on Wikipedia’s PDF rendering cluster. I’ve replaced that with a gevent based job queue server in a short time. gevent is managing the generation of around 100000 PDF files daily and is serving them to wikipedia users.

Recently I’ve refactored the component that fetches articles and images from wikipedia to use gevent instead of twisted. The code is much cleaner and much more manageable then before.

– Ralf Schmitt, Developer, Pediapress

ESN Social Software

Wanting to avoid the ravages of asynchronous programming we choose to base our real-time web development framework Planet on gevent and Python. We’ve found gevent to be stable, efficient, highly functional and still simplistic enough for our needs and our customer’s requirements.

– Jonas Tärnström, Product Manager, ESN Social Software

Blue Shell Games

At Blue Shell Games we use gevent to power the application servers that connect more than a million daily players of our social casino games. Recognizing that our game code is largely I/O bound — whether waiting on a database, social networking data providers, or the clients themselves — we chose gevent as our asynchronous networking framework. Not only does gevent offer the best performance of any of the Python async networking packages, its threading model makes multithreaded application servers far easier to write than traditional kernel threading-based approaches. As our applications add more real-time multiplayer features, gevent is ready to handle these kinds of problems with ease.

– David Young, CTO, Co-Founder, Blue Shell Games

TellApart

At TellApart, we have been using gevent since 2010 as the underpinnings of our frontend servers. It enables us to serve millions of requests every hour through only a handful of servers, while achieving the strict latency constraints of Real-Time Bidding ad exchanges. Since then, we’ve expanded our use of gevent throughout our stack. Combined with tools such as closures and generators, gevent makes complicated queuing, distribution, and streaming workloads dramatically easier to implement. Our open-source event aggregation service, Taba, couldn’t have been built without it.

See also: Gevent at TellApart

– Kevin Ballard, Software Engineer, TellApart

Pinterest

Pinterest is one of the biggest players of gevents. We started using gevent in 2011 to query our mysql shards concurrently. It served us well so far. We run all our WSGI containers using gevent. We are in the process of making all our service calls gevented. We use a gevented based thrift server which proved to be way more efficient than the normal python version. I think there is a cost upfront to make your code greenlet safe but we saw pretty huge win later. If you are looking to scale out on python gevent is your best friend.

– Yash Nelapati, Engineer, Pinterest

TBA: Spotify, Twilio

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